Python Tutorial: ROC

Download the accompanying IPython Notebook for this Tutorial from Github. 

Python streamlines tasks requiring multiple steps in a single block of code. For this reason, it is a great tool for querying and performing analysis on data.

Last Tutorial, we outlined steps for calculating Relative Strength Index (RSI).
In this Tutorial, we introduce a new technical indicator, the Rate of Change (ROC).

‘The only thing constant is change’

The Rate of Change (ROC) is a technical indicator of momentum that measures the percentage change in price between the current price and the price n periods in the past.

The Rate of Change (ROC) is calculated as follows:

ROC = ((Most recent closing price - Closing price n periods ago) / Closing price n periods ago) x 100

The Rate of Change (ROC) is classed as a momentum indicator because it measures strength of price momentum. For example, if a stock’s price at the close of trading today is 10, and the closing price five trading days prior was 7, then the Rate of Change (ROC) over that time frame is approximately 43, calculated as (10 – 7 / 7) x 100 = 42.85.

 Positive values indicate upward buying pressure or momentum, while negative values below zero indicate selling pressure or downward momentum. Increasing values in either direction, positive or negative, indicate increasing momentum, and decreasing values indicate waning momentum.

The Rate of Change (ROC) is also sometimes used to indicate overbought or oversold conditions for a security. Positive values that are greater than 30 are generally interpreted as indicating overbought conditions, while negative values lower than negative 30 indicate oversold conditions.

 Let’s use Python to compute the Rate of Change (ROC).

1.) Import modules.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from pandas_datareader import data as web
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

2.) Define function for querying daily close.

def get_stock(stock,start,end):
     return web.DataReader(stock,'google',start,end)['Close']

3.) Define function for Rate of Change (ROC).

def ROC(df, n):  
    M = df.diff(n - 1)  
    N = df.shift(n - 1)  
    ROC = pd.Series(((M / N) * 100), name = 'ROC_' + str(n))   
    return ROC

How does the ROC function work?

3.a.) Function calculates difference in most recent closing price from closing price n periods ago. Sets the value to variable M.
#M = df.diff(n - 1)

3.b.) Function calculates closing price n periods ago. Sets the value to variable N.

#N = df.shift(n - 1)

3.c.) Function creates series called ROC that is ((M/N) * 100)

#ROC = pd.Series(((M / N) * 100), name = 'ROC_' + str(n))

3.d.) Function returns ROC

#return ROC

4.) Query daily close for ‘FB’ during 2016.

df = pd.DataFrame(get_stock('FB', '1/1/2016', '12/31/2016'))

5.) Run daily close through ROC function. Save series to new column in dataframe.

df['ROC'] = ROC(df['Close'], 12)
df.tail()

6.) Plot daily close and ROC.

df.plot(y=['Close'])
df.plot(y=['ROC'])

There you have it! We created our ROC indicator. Here’s the full code:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from pandas_datareader import data as web
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

def get_stock(stock,start,end):
     return web.DataReader(stock,'google',start,end)['Close']
    
def ROC(df, n):  
    M = df.diff(n - 1)  
    N = df.shift(n - 1)  
    ROC = pd.Series(((M / N) * 100), name = 'ROC_' + str(n))   
    return ROC
    
df = pd.DataFrame(get_stock('FB', '1/1/2016', '12/31/2016'))
df['ROC'] = ROC(df['Close'], 12)
df.tail()

Quantopian: RSI Strategy Backtest

Relative Strength Index (RSI) Strategy Backtest

Contact: andrewshamlet@gmail.com // @andrewshamlet

Download the IPython Notebook that accompanies this Tutorial from Github. 

View the Quantopian Backtest here. 

Summary

  • The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum indicator that compares the magnitude of recent gains and losses over a specified time period. RSI values range from 0 to 100.
  • For this strategy, we buy $FB when the RSI is less than 30, and we will sell $FB when the RSI is greater than 70. The RSI will be calculated at a minutely frequency, as opposed to a daily frequency.
  • During 01/01/16 – 12/31/16,
    • The RSI Strategy produces 32.2% return, resulting in $3,220 pre-tax return.
    • FB Buy & Hold produces 10.0% return, resulting in $1,000 pre-tax return.
    • SPY Buy & Hold produces 12.0% return, resulting in $1,200 pre-tax return.
    • Compared to the SPY Buy & Hold, the RSI Strategy produces $2,220 Alpha whereas FB Buy & Hold produces ($200) Alpha, both on $10,000, principal.
  • During 05/19/12 – 12/31/16,
    • The RSI Strategy produces 147.4% return, resulting in $14,740 pre-tax return.
    • FB Buy & Hold produces 238.5% return, resulting in $23,850 pre-tax return.
    • SPY Buy & Hold produces 89.6% return, resulting in $8,960 pre-tax return.
    • Compared to SPY Buy & Hold, the RSI Strategy produces $5,780 Alpha whereas FB Buy & Hold produces $14,890 Alpha, both on $10,000 principal.
  • Thus, on the broader time horizon, FB Buy & Hold outperforms the RSI Strategy.
  • The question still stands: what about 2016 makes the RSI Strategy superior in performance to FB Buy & Hold?

 

Introduction 

In this post, we use Quantopian to build and backtest a Relative Strength Index (RSI) trading strategy.

 

Quantopian

About Quantopian:

Quantopian provides capital, education, data, a research environment, and a development platform to algorithm authors (quants). Quantopian provides everything a quant needs to create a strategy and profit from it.

Quantopian’s members include finance professionals, scientists, developers, and students from more than 180 countries from around the world. The members collaborate in our forums and in person at regional meetups, workshops, and QuantCon, Quantopian’s flagship annual event.”

In other words, Quantopian is a website where one can build, test, and deploy trading strategies, using Python.

 

Relative Strength Index

To review, the Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum indicator that compares the magnitude of recent gains and losses over a specified time period to measure speed and change of price movements of a security. It is primarily used to identify overbought or oversold conditions in the trading of an asset.

RSI values range from 0 to 100.

The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is calculated as follows:

RSI = 100 - 100 / (1 + RS)

RS = Average gain of last 14 trading days / Average loss of last 14 trading days

 

Strategy

For this strategy, we buy $FB when the RSI is less than 30, and we will sell $FB when the RSI is greater than 70. The RSI will be calculated at a minutely frequency, as opposed to a daily frequency.

Trading Strategy

Buy - RSI < 30

Sell - RSI > 70

 

Code

Here is the Python code for the RSI Strategy.

import talib
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

def initialize(context):
    context.stocks = symbols('FB')
    context.pct_per_stock = 1.0 / len(context.stocks)
    context.LOW_RSI = 30
    context.HIGH_RSI = 70
    
    set_benchmark(sid(42950))  
    
def handle_data(context, data):
    prices = data.history(context.stocks, 'price', 40, '1d')

    rsis = {}
    
    for stock in context.stocks:
        rsi = talib.RSI(prices[stock], timeperiod=14)[-1]
        rsis[stock] = rsi
        
        current_position = context.portfolio.positions[stock].amount
        
        if rsi > context.HIGH_RSI and current_position > 0 and data.can_trade(stock):
            order_target(stock, 0)

        elif rsi < context.LOW_RSI and current_position == 0 and data.can_trade(stock):
            order_target_percent(stock, context.pct_per_stock)

    record(FB_rsi=rsis[symbol('FB')])

At its foundation, Quantopian code is made up of three chunks: import modules, initialize, and handle_data.

1.) First we import the Talib, Numpy, and Pandas modules. As we’ll see, Talib streamlines the calculation of Technical Indicators.

import talib 
import numpy as np 
import pandas as pd

2.)  The initialize function:

def initialize(context): 
     context.stocks = symbols('FB') 
     context.pct_per_stock = 1.0 / len(context.stocks) 
     context.LOW_RSI = 30 
     context.HIGH_RSI = 70 

     set_benchmark(sid(42950)) 

2.a.) Define the security to trade, $FB.

context.stocks = symbols('FB') 

2.b.) Define the weight of each security. Since the RSI Strategy trades one security, the weight is 1.0. If there were two securities, the weight would be 0.5.

context.pct_per_stock = 1.0 / len(context.stocks) 

2.c.) Define the LOW_RSI value as 30

context.LOW_RSI = 30 

2.d.) Define the HIGH_RSI value as 70

context.HIGH_RSI = 70 

2.e.) Define the benchmark to which we will compare our strategy. In the example, the benchmark is set to $FB, essentially a buy and hold strategy. Remove ‘set_benchmark()’ to set the benchmark to the standard, ‘SPY’, or market rate.

set_benchmark(sid(42950)) 

3.)  The handle_data function:

def handle_data(context, data): 
     prices = data.history(context.stocks, 'price', 40, '1d') 

     rsis = {} 

     for stock in context.stocks: 
          rsi = talib.RSI(prices[stock], timeperiod=14)[-1] 
          rsis[stock] = rsi 

          current_position = context.portfolio.positions[stock].amount 

          if rsi > context.HIGH_RSI and current_position > 0 and data.can_trade(stock): 
               order_target(stock, 0) 

          elif rsi < context.LOW_RSI and current_position == 0 and data.can_trade(stock): 
               order_target_percent(stock, context.pct_per_stock) 

     record(FB_rsi=rsis[symbol('FB')])

3.a.) Query the ‘FB’ historical price data for the past 40 trading days.

prices = data.history(context.stocks, 'price', 40, '1d') 

3.b.) Create dictionary of RSI values.

rsis = {} 

3.c.) Create for loop for RSI calculation and order logic.

for stock in context.stocks: 

3.d.) Use Talib to calculate Relative Strength Index.

rsi = talib.RSI(prices[stock], timeperiod=14)[-1]

3.e.) Save Talib output to dictionary.

rsis[stock] = rsi 

3.f.) Save current portfolio positions in order to not execute too many/few orders.

current_position = context.portfolio.positions[stock].amount 

3.g.) Order logic: if RSI is greater than 70 and positions are greater than 0, then sell all positions.

if rsi > context.HIGH_RSI and current_position > 0 and data.can_trade(stock): 
               order_target(stock, 0) 

3.h.) Order logic: if RSI is less than 30 and positions are equal to 0, then buy positions equal to weight defined in initialize function.

elif rsi < context.LOW_RSI and current_position == 0 and data.can_trade(stock): 
               order_target_percent(stock, context.pct_per_stock) 

3.i.) Chart RSI data for $FB.

record(FB_rsi=rsis[symbol('FB')])

1 Year Performance

For the time period, 01/01/16 – 12/31/16

% Return Principal Pre-Tax Return Alpha
RSI Strategy 32.2% $10,000 $3,220 $2,220
FB Buy & Hold 10.0% $10,000 $1,000 ($200)
SPY Buy & Hold 12.0% $10,000 $1,200 N/A

 

We backtest the RSI Strategy with a $10,000 principal for the time period, 01/01/16 – 12/31/16. 

During 01/01/16 – 12/31/16,

  • The RSI Strategy produces 32.2% return, resulting in $3,220 pre-tax return.
  • FB Buy & Hold produces 10.0% return, resulting in $1,000 pre-tax return.
  • SPY Buy & Hold produces 12.0% return, resulting in $1,200 pre-tax return.
  • Compared to the SPY Buy & Hold, the RSI Strategy produces $2,220 Alpha whereas FB Buy & Hold produces ($200) Alpha, both on $10,000, principal.

 

 

Beyond 1 Year Performance

Yes, $2,220 Alpha on $10,000 principal is impressive.

Before we go and bet the farm, let’s see how the RSI Strategy performs over a longer time period.

Since the ‘FB’ IPO occurred on 05/18/12, we will backtest for the period 05/19/12 – 12/31/16.

For the time period, 05/19/12 – 12/31/16

% Return Principal Pre-Tax Return Alpha
RSI Strategy 147.4% $10,000 $14,740 $5,780
FB Buy & Hold 238.5% $10,000 $23,850 $14,890
SPY Buy & Hold 89.6% 10,000 $8,960 N/A

During 05/19/12 – 12/31/16,

  • The RSI Strategy produces 147.4% return, resulting in $14,740 pre-tax return.
  • FB Buy & Hold produces 238.5% return, resulting in $23,850 pre-tax return.
  • SPY Buy & Hold produces 89.6% return, resulting in $8,960 pre-tax return.
  • Compared to SPY Buy & Hold, the RSI Strategy produces $5,780 Alpha whereas FB Buy & Hold produces $14,890 Alpha, both on $10,000 principal.

Thus, on the broader time horizon, FB Buy & Hold outperforms the RSI Strategy.

 

Concluding Thought

Over the long term, money would go further with the FB Buy & Hold strategy.

The question still stands: what about 2016 makes the RSI Strategy superior in performance to FB Buy & Hold?

Until next time!

If they Google You, Do you Win?

In a way, this election is a referendum on “do actions speak louder than words”, is what people do in the privacy of their internet browsing more reflective of their future behavior than what they tell pollsters? And while I have focused on twitter as a barometer of public opinion, there are other data sources that could signal the private thoughts and future actions of voters. The linked NYT article, “If they Google you, Do you Win?”, mentions using the Google queries “Trump Clinton” vs. “Clinton Trump” as signals of voter interest, with the respective queries reflecting bias towards the candidate listed first, i.e. “Clinton Trump” would reflect bias towards Clinton. Using this methodology, I researched Google trends for Battleground states to see where public opinion may be. The data are displayed below.

screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-5-49-10-pm

For the month of October 2016, “Trump Clinton” leads “Clinton Trump” in every state with the exception of Nevada.

You might say Trump is a polarizing celebrity, and for that reason he may be top of mind even if the individual plans to vote for Clinton. Okay, well then let’s penalize Trump 10%. Even in that case, ‘Factored “Trump Clinton”‘ indicates that, with the exception of Nevada, the three states that are in play are Virginia, Iowa, and Florida.

So while it is unclear in which direction the election will result, I believe we may be surprised at how close the results turn out to be, and that one thing we may remember is the discrepancy between what was reported in the polls leading up to the election and what actually happened online. We only have 4 days left to see which source provides a clearer signal of truth, and until then….Good luck to both candidates!

Sentiment Analysis: Donald Trump & Hillary Clinton Tweets, Oct 5 – Oct 11, 2015

Emotion drives our decision-making. By appealing to emotion, others can persuade us to make decisions. We experience this during political campaigns.

Donald Trump knows the power of emotion. A charismatic leader, Trump infuses his speeches with appeals to emotion. Sentiment analysis makes this clear.

Comparing Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, I sampled tweets from their respective profiles, published between Monday October 5, 2015, and Sunday October 11, 2015. Using sentiment analysis, each tweet was given a score between -1, the most negative, and +1, the most positive. Plotted across the 7 days, the results are displayed below, with Trump in red and Hillary in blue.
sentimentanalysisfinal

Trump exhibits a noisier sentiment artifact. Trump has almost no tweets with a sentiment score of 0. Trump peaks at +1 nine times; Hillary peaks at +1 three times. Using statistics, we see with Trump there is a greater range of sentiment, with a tendency towards positive sentiment. The Median Sentiment for Donald Trump is 0.21, whereas the Median Sentiment for Hillary Clinton is 0. The Standard Deviation for Donald Trump is 0.39, whereas the Standard Deviation for Hillary Clinton is 0.30.

Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
Median Sentiment 0.21 0.00
Standard Deviation 0.39 0.30

boxandwhiskers

So why does this matter? Noisy sentiment drives engagement. 

The chart below shows average tweet engagement for the respective profiles, for tweets published between Monday October 5, 2015, and Sunday October 11, 2015.

Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
Avg. Retweets 1028 783
Avg. Favorites 2136 1196

– Trump received 1.31 retweets for every 1 retweet Clinton received

– Trump received 1.79 favorites for every 1 favorite Clinton received

So while some political analysts doubt Trump’s ability to win over the Republican Establishment, these findings clearly show Trump resonates with the people who have direct access to him on Twitter. Like television before it, social media has ushered in a new era of political campaign strategy, and we must ask, how will this new means of communication influence the selection of the Republican Presidential Nominee.